Introducing the Visual Boxscore

I’ve always wanted to revolutionize the baseball box score to reveal more information at a glance.  Here’s a first stab, using an old box score from Game 3 of the 2009 ALDS between the Angels and Red Sox.  You’ll see a key in the lower left corner that explains everything.  I’m still missing a lot of information I’d like to convey (most notably the performance of the pitchers in the game).  And there are many aspects to this that I am not sure about.  Still, I’m interested in seeing if this is a promising start.

One litmus test is to ask “what information does this convey about what happened in the game?”  Here are a few:

For the Angels:

– After a slow start, Vlad Guerrero had a terrific game, getting on base 3 times and driving in 2.
– The Angels came to life in the 9th, putting 5 consecutive hitters on base and scoring 3 times.
– The middle of the Angels order was pretty productive, driving in 6 runs and generally wreaking havoc.
– Until the 9th, the Angels had only strung together consecutive hits once (in the 6th)
– 10 Angels batters stranded runners in scoring position.
– The Angels drove in 5 of their 7 runs without the benefit of an extra base hit

For the Red Sox:

– Lowell was on base 3 times and drove in 1.
– Drew had a mixed day.  He drove in 2, but also ended two innings.
– The Red Sox never got a lead off man on base in any inning.
– No Red Sox batter stranded a runner in scoring position.
– The Red Sox scored 5 of their 6 runs in the second time up against Scott Kazmir.
– The Red Sox drove in all 6 of their runs via extra base hits

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One thought on “Introducing the Visual Boxscore

  1. Nice. A traditional box score shows aggregate player performance detail, with no sense of how each player contributed to the flow of the game. This tries to integrate the two.
    But I think it is too weak on details of player performance.
    Seems to me you could easily provide more details: walk is italicized, single is not. Triple is underlined, double is not. Reached base on error is grey, but the first letter of their name is red. Out is bolded if a strike-out. Bolded and underlined if they hit into a double play.
    How about pitcher performance? Every box score needs that as well!

    Love your stuff…

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